Blind tasting challenge #1

As part of my WSET training, I force myself to blind taste wines and go through the description process that I have to apply. This could potentially be embarrassing, but it could be fun too. I grab a bottle off my wine rack (among a dozen options), then I put it in my trusty blind tasting sock, open it and then well, the magic happens. Well the magic is basically me going through my checklist of characteristics of the wine, it’s not very exciting as a spectator sport even though it’s like the Superbowl in my mouth. At the end I will venture a guess as of the nature of the wine and a judgement on its quality Simple in principle, complicated in practice.

The trusty wine sock

The trusty wine sock

Appearance :

Clarity : Clear

Intensity : pale

Colour : Ruby

Other Observations : with legs

I need better lighting for these pictures...

I need better lighting for these pictures…

Nose :

Condition : Clean

Intensity: medium +

Aroma Characteristics : red fruits : red cherries, raspberries, strawberries, fruit jam, stewed fruit, plum

Development : Developing

Palate :

Sweetness : dry

Acidity : high

Tannin : medium –

Alcohol : medium

Body : medium –

Flavour intensity : medium +

Flavour characteristic : red cherry, plum, prune, stewed fruit, redcurrant

Finish : medium –

Conclusions :

Quality level : acceptable

Level of readiness : can drink now, potential for ageing (but not much, maybe a couple years)

Identity : New World Pinot Noir, warm climate

Price category : mid-priced

20150309_192555

The wine : Mohua Pinot Noir 2012 from Central Otago, New Zealand

I got the New World and the variety and Central Otago is considered a warm region so, I didn’t do too bad. The winery’s tasting notes mention liquorice and cranberry, which I didn’t get at all… This did not end up too badly. I’m sure the next one will see me comically fail. Trust the process they say.

 

And we’re back

All right, I know, I’ve been slacking on this blog lately. I have some good excuses; I also have some bad ones. On the good excuses side, well, I got a new job that is significantly more challenging and time consuming than the last one. I also moved into a new place, which meant well, moving, home improvement, getting situated in a new (and awesome) neighborhood. And I have been travelling quite a bit, hitting Paris, Chicago, New-York, Wisconsin and Chicago again. My life has been busier lately, which is a good thing. As for the bad excuses, well, it’s just the one actually, I’m a generally very lazy person, so there.

But, I’m now starting to get back on my feet work-wise, apartment-wise, time-wise and wine-wise. Steps have been taken. Namely, I have registered for the WSET Level 3 courses, I’m starting next February. That means I have to step up my tasting game. Also, there are holiday parties, with wines to select, match and drink. Tis the season to get rosy cheeks.

Back in the saddle then, with a classic 2 wines evening. Let me see if I still know how to write a blog post,…

And Co, The Supernatural 2010, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand – ($20)

100% Sauvignon Blanc, the funky grape variety that is New Zealand’s main white grape

20141213_203111A very nice medium gold color. Low to medium intensity on the nose with bunches of tropical fruits, mostly passion fruit. A little bit of grassy notes too. The wine has a medium body with low to medium acidity. Tropical fruits galore (the label promises passion fruit, and it’s not lying). I also got some apricot and some pretty strong gooseberry aromas (the latter being completely absent from the nose).

Overall a good crisp Sauvignon Blanc, not necessarily on the funky side but more fruity and playful. Also the bottle looks cool and opens with a beer opener, that’s novelty.

Domaine de Baron’Arques, 2010, Limoux, France – ($35)

Blend of Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Grenache, Malbec and Merlot

domaine-de-baron-arques-limouxWell, this wine too is a novelty. Limoux in Southern France, is an appellation primarily known for sparkling wine, the Blanquette de Limoux. It turns out that there is also a small Limoux Rouge appellation that produces red wine. This particular bottle is produced by the Rothschild family, of Bordeaux fame, and it’s interesting as a case study because it blends the Bordeaux grapes (Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Merlot) with the Rhone grapes (Grenache, Syrah) and the southwest grape (Malbec).

It’s a deep ruby wine, red fruits and black pepper on the nose and palate. To me it was mostly reminiscent of a Bordeaux wine with a hint of Rhone spice. I felt like Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah dominated the blend.

As I said, it’s a novelty wine, more interesting for the idea of it than for the quality. It’s not bad by any standards but I don’t think it’s worth the price.

It’s good to get back on the saddle. Hopefully I will  manage to have a more consistent posting schedule, we shall see !

Get me to the Greek, Xinomavro from Naoussa

As my friend Laurie continues to work towards her WSET diploma, we, her friends, get treated to wine tasting dinners with some good quality stuff, anything to help a friend study, self-sacrifice and all… Case in point, last week, our tasting line-up included:

–          Sogrape, Quinta de Azevedo Vinho Verde 2013. 

A vinho verde from Portugal with a majority of Loureiro grapes. Slightly sparkling with complex, layered aromas (citrus, white flowers, tropical fruit).

Quinta VV

–          Babich, Malborough Pinot Noir 2010.

A Pinot Noir from New Zealand, very jammy, lots of cooked or jammy fruit notes (prunes, plums, cherries). I’m not a fan of this overripe style of Pinot. It must be my (cold and calculating) Burgundian side and ancestry protesting this use of OUR grape.

–          Robert Talbott, Logan Sleepy Hollow Pinot Noir 2011.

Another Pinot Noir, this time for California. Surprisingly more subdued than the NZ example above. The fruit notes were still ripe but not cooked. A well-made wine.

Talbot

–          Boutari, Naoussa Grande Reserve 2007

Now this last wine deserves a proper write up. Even though the label is in French “Grande Reserve” this is actually Greek wine.

Naoussa Boutari

Now, I get that Greece is not necessarily considered a major wine producing nation, when people thing of European wine countries it usually goes: France, Italy, Germany, Spain.  Greece has both a past and a future in wine-making though. The past part is obvious, most of European culture emerged from Greek civilization and its later appropriation by the Romans, which includes wine-making. Now for the future part, Greek wines have started to be recognized by critics lately and they are now considered quality products.

Boutari is one of the main, if not the main Greek wine producer. The Naoussa appellation is located in Northern Greece, in the region of Macedonia. Not the country Macedonia, but the Macedonia region of Greece, because, of course let’s try not to confuse people. The appellation includes 9 villages, including Naoussa which gives its name to the whole appellation.

Naoussa is a single variety appellation with only xinomavro vines being planted. Xinomavro or Ξινόμαυρο (I couldn’t resist putting it in Greek, I’m a language nerd), it’s a native Greek variety that is often compared to Pinot Noir (light color, tendency to become brownish with age, high acidity) or Nebbiolo (strong tannins, angular structure, ageing potential). You’ll have to admit, there are worse comparisons.

The thing is, those comparisons are what they are and surely they can point you in the right directions if you’ve never had xinomavro before, but, in my opinion, xinomavro is very much its own thing. I had two different wines from Naoussa and both were among the most unique wines I ever tasted. They have all they need in terms of body, structure and tannins, but they tend to be on the funkier side in terms of aromas: caramel, liquorice, herbs and olives…

If you can get your hands on some, and I think Boutari wines are fairly well distributed in the US, I definitely recommend going for it. They are well made wines with ageing potential and they will broaden your horizons. At the very least, you’ll remember tasting them, there is nothing quite like it.